Dopamine 101

A Confederacy of Addicts

by Charles Lyell on February 18, 2015

To protect themselves from honesty, and the unconsciousness required to continue indulging addictions, confederates play a flimsy but effective dopamine game called I’ll Let You Deny Your Addictions If You Let Me Deny Mine.



Dopamine Reviews: Think Like A Freak (cont)

by Charles Lyell on January 13, 2015

In a previous post I expressed my appreciation for Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner’s “Think Like a Freak: The Authors of Freakonomics Offer to Retrain Your Brain.” This time around I’d like to address a few reservations.



Are South Park’s Writers Smarter Than Scientists Or Do They Just Have Bigger Balls?

by Charles Lyell on November 17, 2014

“It’s not fuckin’ rocket science, this stuff.”
– Prince of Temptation



Heliocentrism and Neurocentrism

by Charles Lyell on December 9, 2013

Heliocentrism, an astronomical model, took decades to go from poppycock to common knowledge because it threatened dopamine flow by turning everyone’s world right side up. Neurocentrism, a behavioral model, might take years to gain widespread acceptance because it threatens dopamine flow by turning everyone’s world outside in.



Dopamine Dialogues: Advice from a Junk Food, Sex, Porn, Acceptance, Music, and Drug-Disdaining Addict

August 4, 2013

“I never did drugs, because I knew that they were just stupid. I was in shock knowing that I was addicted to DOPAMINE.” – Michael



B.F. Skinner, Dopamine, Superstition, and the Addictive Power of “Maybe”

by Charles Lyell on July 23, 2013

“The real problem is not whether machines think but whether men do.” – B. F. Skinner



Mark Twain, Dopamine Expert

by Charles Lyell on June 8, 2013

“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man’s reasoning powers are not above the monkey’s.”
– Mark Twain



The Semmelweis Reflex

by Charles Lyell on May 3, 2013

The Semmelweis reflex is one reason it might take years until the information contained on this site is considered common knowledge.




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