Is Ann Coulter Insane?

by Charles Lyell on October 10, 2012
Obama blinked a LOT more. Studies say it’s a result of stress, dopamine levels & prefrontal cortex executive function.

“When the manipulations of childhood are a little larceny, they may grow and change with the child into qualities useful and admired in the grown-up world. When they are the futile struggle for love and concern and protection, they may become the warped and ruthless machinations of adults who seek in the advantages of power what they could never win as children.” – Leontine Young

It was encouraging to see Ann Coulter’s oft retweeted tweet about dopamine because it’s a reminder that even unconscious types are dropping the neurotransmitter’s name.

If Ms. Coulter had a modicum of consciousness she would have avoided referencing the brain chemical behind the brain disease that’s responsible for her seemingly inane, illogical, and reprehensible behavior.

It’s only a question of time until there’s a free phone app capable of demonstrating that Ann is an out-of-control attention addict. The $1.98 upgrade of the app will explain how Ann uses absurd tweets, silly sound bites, and outrageous statements to attract the attention that triggers the same dopamine that junkies trigger with heroin.

Researchers tell us that there is only one addiction and it’s to the chemical highs triggered in our primitive brains by substances (drugs, food) and behaviors (sex, gambling, tweeting). In other words, heroin, nicotine, food, gambling, and tweeting are triggers that addictive personality types use to score dopamine.

Dopamine is the reason Ann cares less about science, honesty, or looking like a clown than heroin addicts care about being called junkies. Like all addicts, Ann is driven by a single need — to put out the pain of dopamine-induced withdrawal. Nothing else matters.

Because heroin and attention addicts are slaves to the same neurotransmitter, they exhibit the same psychopathology, including self-deception, lying, a marked decrease in reason, an infinite capacity to deny their addictions, and an inability to admit to their highly irrational, illogical, and/or immoral acts.

Unfortunately for Ms. Coulter, childhood traumas shackled little Annie with acute dopamine deprivation and insatiable dopamine cravings. Unfortunately for the United States, instead of using junk to trigger dopamine, Ann discovered how to use junk thinking to score her dopamine fixes.

On a sane planet, Ann would be too embarrassed to do what she does because everyone would understand that her dishonest tweets, rants, and diatribes are only a step away from yelling, “Notice me!” “Help me feel special!” “Please take me seriously!”

In our sick society, there are tens of millions of easily threatened racists, bigots, zealots, right wingers, and other safety addicts who find Ann’s perverse dopamine appeal intoxicating. Safety addicts tend to be cowards who can’t admit that they’re insecure, frightened, dishonest scaredy-cats. Scaredy-cats aren’t interested in facts that threaten dopamine flow. They want dopamine-triggering rationalizations, deceptions, and scapegoats to blame their irrational fears on, which is exactly what Coulter offers.

Getting to the heart of Coulter’s heartlessness provides new insights into a communicable brain disease that rewards codependent addicts with gratuitous dopamine hits. Ann spews spiteful dopamine-triggering hatred to self-deceptive safety addicts who, in return, lavish Ann with the dopamine-inducing attention that she desperately craves.

Everything will change when the first group of open-minded researchers accept that safety, power, acceptance, peer-approval, attention, esteem, status, money, and religion addictions are not only more common than drug addictions, they’re more dangerous and destructive than drug addictions.

 

 

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Discussion

One Response to “Is Ann Coulter Insane?”

  1. Why are there no comments yet? This site is brilliant. It explains everything! And it’s hilarious too.

    Posted by Vivienne | February 22, 2013, 2:05 pm

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